Poésies de Alfred Lord Tennyson

gb-engPoésie anglaise

A

  • A Farewell

    Flow down, cold rivulet, to the sea,
    Thy tribute wave deliver:
    No more by thee my steps shall be,
    For ever and for ever.

  • After-Thought

    I thought of Thee, my partner and my guide,
    As being past away. -Vain sympathies!
    For backward, Duddon! as I cast my eyes,

  • All Things will Die

    All Things will Die
    Clearly the blue river chimes in its flowing
    Under my eye;
    Warmly and broadly the south winds are blowing

  • Amphion

    MY father left a park to me,
    But it is wild and barren,
    A garden too with scarce a tree,
    And waster than a warren:

  • Ask Me No More

    Ask me no more: the moon may draw the sea;
    The cloud may stoop from heaven and take the shape,

  • Audley Court

    Audley Court
    ?The Bull, the Fleece are cramm?d, and not a room
    For love or money. Let us picnic there
    At Audley Court.?

  • ‘And ask ye why these sad tears stream?’

    'And ask ye why these sad tears stream?'
    ?Te somnia nostra reducunt.?
    OVID.
    And ask ye why these sad tears stream?

B

  • Balin and Balan

    Pellam the King, who held and lost with Lot
    In that first war, and had his realm restored

  • Battle Of Brunanburgh

    Athelstan King,
    Lord among Earls,
    Bracelet-bestower and
    Baron of Barons,
    He with his brother,
    Edmund Atheling,

  • Beautiful City

    Beautiful city
    Beautiful city, the centre and crater of European confusion,

  • Blow, Bugle, Blow

    THE splendour falls on castle walls
    And snowy summits old in story:
    The long light shakes across the lakes,

  • Boadicea

    While about the shore of Mona those Neronian legionaries
    Burnt and broke the grove and altar of the Druid and Druidess,

  • By an Evolutionist

    By an Evolutionist
    The Lord let the house of a brute to the soul of a man,
    And the man said, ?Am I your debtor??

C

  • Charge of the Light Brigade

    I.
    Half a league, half a league,
    Half a league onward,
    All in the valley of Death
    Rode the six hundred.

  • Claribel

    Where Claribel low-lieth
    The breezes pause and die,
    Letting the rose-leaves fall:
    But the solemn oak-tree sigheth,

  • Claribel: A Melody

    Where Claribel low-lieth
    The breezes pause and die,
    Letting the rose-leaves fall:
    But the solemn oak-tree sigheth,

  • Come down, O Maid

    COME down, O maid, from yonder mountain height:
    What pleasure lives in height (the shepherd sang),

  • Come Into the Garde, Maud

    Come into the garden, Maud,
    For the black bat, Night, has flown,
    Come into the garden, Maud,
    I am here at the gate alone;

  • Come not when I am dead

    Come not, when I am dead,
    To drop thy foolish tears upon my grave,
    To trample round my fallen head,

  • Cradle Song

    What does little birdie say
    In her nest at peep of day?
    Let me fly, says little birdie,
    Mother, let me fly away.

  • Crossing the Bar

    Sunset and evening star,
    And one clear call for me!
    And may there be no moaning of the bar,
    When I put out to sea,

D

  • Dedication

    Dedication
    These to His Memory--since he held them dear,
    Perchance as finding there unconsciously

  • Demeter and Persephone

    Faint as a climate-changing bird that flies
    All night across the darkness, and at dawn

  • Duet

    1. Is it the wind of the dawn that I hear
    in the pine overhead?
    2. No; but the voice of the deep as it hollows

E

  • Enoch Arden

    Long lines of cliff breaking have left a chasm;
    And in the chasm are foam and yellow sands;

F

  • Fatima

    O LOVE, Love, Love! O withering might!
    O sun, that from thy noonday height
    Shudderest when I strain my sight,

G

  • Gareth And Lynette

    The last tall son of Lot and Bellicent,
    And tallest, Gareth, in a showerful spring
    Stared at the spate.A slender-shafted Pine

  • Geraint And Enid

    O purblind race of miserable men,
    How many among us at this very hour
    Do forge a life-long trouble for ourselves,

  • Guinevere

    Queen Guinevere had fled the court, and sat
    There in the holy house at Almesbury
    Weeping, none with her save a little maid,

H

I

L

  • Lady Clare

    IT was the time when lilies blow,
    And clouds are highest up in air,
    Lord Ronald brought a lily-white doe

  • Lancelot And Elaine

    Elaine the fair, Elaine the loveable,
    Elaine, the lily maid of Astolat,
    High in her chamber up a tower to the east

  • Late, Late, So Late

    Late, late, so late! and dark the night and chill!
    Late, late, so late! but we can enter still.

  • Lilian

    I
    Airy, Fairy Lilian,
    Flitting, fairy Lilian,
    When I ask her if she love me,
    Claps her tiny hands above me,

  • Locksley Hall

    Comrades, leave me here a little, while as yet 't is early morn:

  • Lucretius

    Lucilla, wedded to Lucretius, found
    Her master cold; for when the morning flush
    Of passion and the first embrace had died

M

  • Mariana

    WITH BLACKEST moss the flower-plots
    Were thickly crusted, one and all:
    The rusted nails fell from the knots

  • Mariana In The South

    With one black shadow at its feet,
    The house thro' all the level shines,
    Close-latticed to the brooding heat,

  • Maud: A Monodrama (Part II, excerpt)

    .
    O that 'twere possible
    .
    After long grief and pain
    .
    To find the arms of my true love
    .
    Round me once again!2.

  • Merlin And Vivien

    A storm was coming, but the winds were still,
    And in the wild woods of Broceliande,
    Before an oak, so hollow, huge and old

  • Milton (Alcaics)

    O mighty-mouth'd inventor of harmonies,
    O skill'd to sing of Time or Eternity,
    God-gifted organ-voice of England,

  • Minnie and Winnie

    Minnie and Winnie
    Slept in a shell.
    Sleep, little ladies!
    And they slept well.
    Pink was the shell within,
    Silver without;

  • Morte D'Arthur

    So all day long the noise of battle roll'd
    Among the mountains by the winter sea;
    Until King Arthur's table, man by man,

  • Move Eastward, Happy Earth

    Move eastward, happy earth, and leave
    Yon orange sunset waning slow:
    From fringes of the faded eve,

N

O

  • O Beauty, Passing Beauty!

    O beauty, passing beauty! Sweetest sweet!
    How can thou let me waste my youth in sighs?
    I only ask to sit beside thy feet.

  • O, Were I Loved As I Desire To Be!

    O, were I loved as I desire to be!
    What is there in the great sphere of the earth,
    Or range of evil between death and birth,

  • Of Old Sat Freedom

    Of old sat Freedom on the heights,
    The thunders breaking at her feet:
    Above her shook the starry lights:

  • Of Old Sat Freedom on the Heights

    Of old sat Freedom on the heights,
    The thunders breaking at her feet:
    Above her shook the starry lights:

P

R

  • Recollections of the Arabian Nights.

    When the breeze of a joyful dawn blew free
    In the silken sail of infancy,
    The tide of time flow'd back with me,

  • Requiescat

    Fair is her cottage in its place,
    Where yon broad water sweetly slowly glides.
    It sees itself from thatch to base

S

  • Sea Dreams

    A city clerk, but gently born and bred;
    His wife, an unknown artist's orphan child--

  • Sir Galahad

    MY good blade carves the casques of men,
    My tough lance thrusteth sure,
    My strength is as the strength of ten,

  • Sir Launcelot and Queen Guinevere

    LIKE souls that balance joy and pain,
    With tears and smiles from heaven again
    The maiden Spring upon the plain

  • Spring

    Birds' love and birds' song
    Flying here and there,
    Birds' songand birds' love
    And you with gold for hair!

  • St. Agnes' Eve

    Deep on the convent-roof the snows
    Are sparkling to the moon:
    My breath to heaven like vapour goes;
    May my soul follow soon!

  • Sweet And Low

    Sweet and low, sweet and low,
    Wind of the western sea,
    Low, low, breathe and blow,
    Wind of the western sea!

T

  • Tears, Idle Tears

    Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean,
    Tears from the depth of some divine despair

  • The Brook

    I come from haunts of coot and hern,
    I make a sudden sally
    And sparkle out among the fern,
    To bicker down a valley.

  • The Charge Of The Light Brigade

    HALF a league, half a league,
    Half a league onward,
    All in the valley of Death
    Rode the six hundred.

  • The Coming Of Arthur

    Leodogran, the King of Cameliard,
    Had one fair daughter, and none other child;
    And she was the fairest of all flesh on earth,

  • The Deserted House

    Life and Thought have gone away
    Side by side,
    Leaving door and windows wide.
    Careless tenants they!

  • The Eagle

    He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
    Close to the sun in lonely lands,
    Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.

  • The Eagle (A Fragment )

    He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
    Close to the sun in lonely lands,
    Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.

  • The Flower

    Once in a golden hour
    I cast to earth a seed.
    Up there came a flower,
    The people said, a weed.
    To and fro they went

  • The Garden

    Excerpt from "Maud"
    She is coming, my own, my sweet;
    Were it ever so airy a tread,
    My heart would hear her and beat,

  • The Grandmother

    I.
    And Willy, my eldest-born, is gone, you say, little Anne?
    Ruddy and white, and strong on his legs, he looks like a man.

  • Tous les poèmes de Alfred Lord Tennyson débutant par la lettre T

U

  • Ulysses

    It little profits that an idle king,
    By this still hearth, among these barren crags,
    Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole

Y