Poésies de Elizabeth Barrett Browning

gb-engPoésie anglaise

A

  • A Child Asleep

    How he sleepeth! having drunken
    Weary childhood's mandragore,
    From his pretty eyes have sunken

  • A Curse For A Nation

    I heard an angel speak last night,
    And he said 'Write!
    Write a Nation's curse for me,
    And send it over the Western Sea.'

  • A Man's Requirements

    I
    Love me Sweet, with all thou art,
    Feeling, thinking, seeing;
    Love me in the lightest part,
    Love me in full being.
    II

  • A Musical Instrument

    What was he doing, the great god Pan,
    Down in the reeds by the river?
    Spreading ruin and scattering ban,

  • A Sea-Side Walk

    We walked beside the sea,
    After a day which perished silently
    Of its own glory---like the Princess weird

  • A Thought For A Lonely Death-Bed

    IF God compel thee to this destiny,
    To die alone, with none beside thy bed
    To ruffle round with sobs thy last word said

  • A Woman's Shortcomings

    She has laughed as softly as if she sighed,
    She has counted six, and over,
    Of a purse well filled, and a heart well tried -

  • A Year's Spinning

    1
    He listened at the porch that day,
    To hear the wheel go on, and on;
    And then it stopped, ran back away,

  • Adequacy

    NOW, by the verdure on thy thousand hills,
    Beloved England, doth the earth appear
    Quite good enough for men to overbear

  • An Apprehension

    IF all the gentlest-hearted friends I know
    Concentred in one heart their gentleness,

  • Tous les poèmes de Elizabeth Barrett Browning débutant par la lettre A

B

C

  • Change Upon Change

    Five months ago the stream did flow,
    The lilies bloomed within the sedge,
    And we were lingering to and fro,

  • Cheerfulness Taught By Reason

    I THINK we are too ready with complaint
    In this fair world of God's. Had we no hope
    Indeed beyond the zenith and the slope

  • Chorus of Eden Spirits

    HEARKEN, oh hearken! let your souls behind you
    Turn, gently moved!
    Our voices feel along the Dread to find you,

  • Comfort

    SPEAK low to me, my Saviour, low and sweet
    From out the hallelujahs, sweet and low

  • Consolation

    All are not taken; there are left behind
    Living Belovèds, tender looks to bring
    And make the daylight still a happy thing,

D

  • De Profundis

    I
    The face, which, duly as the sun,
    Rose up for me with life begun,
    To mark all bright hours of the day

  • Deserted Garden, The

    I mind me in the days departed,
    How often underneath the sun
    With childish bounds I used to run
    To a garden long deserted.

  • Discontent

    LIGHT human nature is too lightly tost
    And ruffled without cause, complaining on--
    Restless with rest, until, being overthrown,

E

  • Exaggeration

    WE overstate the ills of life, and take
    Imagination (given us to bring down
    The choirs of singing angels overshone

F

  • From ‘The Soul’s Travelling’

    God, God!
    With a child?s voice I cry,
    Weak, sad, confidingly
    God, God!
    Thou knowest, eyelids, raised not always up

  • Futurity

    AND, O beloved voices, upon which
    Ours passionately call because erelong
    Ye brake off in the middle of that song

G

  • Grief

    I TELL you, hopeless grief is passionless;
    That only men incredulous of despair,

H

  • House Of Clouds, The

    I would build a cloudy House
    For my thoughts to live in;
    When for earth too fancy-loose
    And too low for Heaven!

  • How Do I Love Thee?

    How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
    I love thee to the depth and breadth and height

  • Human Life’s Mystery

    We sow the glebe, we reap the corn,
    We build the house where we may rest,
    And then, at moments, suddenly,

I

  • I

    I thought once how Theocritus had sung
    Of the sweet years, the dear and wished-for years,

  • II

    But only three in all God's universe
    Have heard this word thou hast said,--Himself, beside

  • III

    Unlike are we, unlike, O princely Heart !
    Unlike our uses and our destinies.
    Our ministering two angels look surprise

  • Insufficiency

    When I attain to utter forth in verse
    Some inward thought, my soul throbs audibly
    Along my pulses, yearning to be free

  • Irreparableness

    I HAVE been in the meadows all the day
    And gathered there the nosegay that you see
    Singing within myself as bird or bee

  • IV

    Thou hast thy calling to some palace-floor,
    Most gracious singer of high poems ! where

  • IX

    Can it be right to give what I can give ?
    To let thee sit beneath the fall of tears
    As salt as mine, and hear the sighing years

L

  • Lady's Yes, The

    "Yes," I answered you last night;
    "No," this morning, Sir, I say.
    Colours seen by candlelight,
    Will not look the same by day.

  • Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers, The

    The breaking waves dashed high
    On a stern and rock-bound coast,
    And the woods, against a stormy sky,
    Their giant branches tost;

  • Look, The

    The Saviour looked on Peter. Ay, no word,
    No gesture of reproach; the Heavens serene

  • Lord Walter's Wife

    I
    'But where do you go?' said the lady, while both sat under the yew,

M

  • Meaning Of The Look, The

    I think that look of Christ might seem to say--
    'Thou Peter ! art thou then a common stone

  • Minstrelsy

    For ever, since my childish looks
    Could rest on Nature's pictured books;
    For ever, since my childish tongue

  • Mother and Poet

    I.
    Dead ! One of them shot by the sea in the east,
    And one of them shot in the west by the sea.

  • My Heart and I

    I.
    ENOUGH ! we're tired, my heart and I.
    We sit beside the headstone thus,
    And wish that name were carved for us.

  • My Letters! all dead paper. . . (Sonnet XXVIII)

    My letters! all dead paper, mute and white!
    And yet they seem alive and quivering

O

  • On A Portrait Of Wordsworth

    WORDSWORTH upon Helvellyn ! Let the cloud
    Ebb audibly along the mountain-wind,
    Then break against the rock, and show behind

  • On A Portrait Of Wordsworth By B. R. Haydon

    Wordsworth upon Helvellyn ! Let the cloud
    Ebb audibly along the mountain-wind,
    Then break against the rock, and show behind

  • Only a Curl.

    I.
    FRIENDS of faces unknown and a land
    Unvisited over the sea,
    Who tell me how lonely you stand

P

  • Pain In Pleasure

    A THOUGHT ay like a flower upon mine heart,
    And drew around it other thoughts like bees

  • Past and Future.

    MY future will not copy fair my past
    On any leaf but Heaven's. Be fully done,
    Supernal Will ! I would not fain be one

  • Patience Taught By Nature

    'O DREARY life,' we cry, ' O dreary life ! '
    And still the generations of the birds

  • Perplexed Music

    EXPERIENCE, like a pale musician, holds
    A dulcimer of patience in his hand,
    Whence harmonies, we cannot understand,

  • Poet And The Bird, The

    Said a people to a poet---" Go out from among us straightway!
    While we are thinking earthly things, thou singest of divine.

  • Prisoner, The

    I count the dismal time by months and years
    Since last I felt the green sward under foot,

R

  • Rosalind's Scroll

    I LEFT thee last, a child at heart,
    A woman scarce in years:
    I come to thee, a solemn corpse
    Which neither feels nor fears.

  • Runaway Slave at Pilgrim's Point, The

    I.
    I stand on the mark beside the shore
    Of the first white pilgrim's bended knee,
    Where exile turned to ancestor,

S

T

  • Tears

    THANK God, bless God, all ye who suffer not
    More grief than ye can weep for. That is well--

  • The Autumn

    Go, sit upon the lofty hill,
    And turn your eyes around,
    Where waving woods and waters wild
    Do hymn an autumn sound.

X

  • XXXVII

    Pardon, oh, pardon, that my soul should make,
    Of all that strong divineness which I know
    For thine and thee, an image only so

  • XXXVIII

    First time he kissed me, he but only kissed
    The fingers of this hand wherewith I write;