Poésies de Thomas Hardy

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A

  • A Broken Appointment

    You did not come,
    And marching Time drew on, and wore me numb.
    Yet less for loss of your dear presence there

  • A Christmas Ghost Story.

    South of the Line, inland from far Durban,
    A mouldering soldier lies--your countryman.
    Awry and doubled up are his gray bones,

  • A Christmas Ghost-Story

    South of the Line, inland from far Durban,
    A mouldering soldier lies--your countryman.
    Awry and doubled up are his gray bones,

  • A Commonplace Day

    The day is turning ghost,
    And scuttles from the kalendar in fits and furtively,
    To join the anonymous host

  • A Commonplace Day.

    The day is turning ghost,
    And scuttles from the kalendar in fits and furtively,
    To join the anonymous host

  • A Confession To A Friend in Trouble

    YOUR troubles shrink not, though I feel them less
    Here, far away, than when I tarried near;

  • A Man (In Memory of H. of M.)

    I
    In Casterbridge there stood a noble pile,
    Wrought with pilaster, bay, and balustrade

  • A Meeting With Despair

    AS evening shaped I found me on a moor
    Which sight could scarce sustain:
    The black lean land, of featureless contour,

  • A Sign-Seeker

    I MARK the months in liveries dank and dry,
    The day-tides many-shaped and hued;
    I see the nightfall shades subtrude,

  • A Spot

    In years defaced and lost,
    Two sat here, transport-tossed,
    Lit by a living love
    The wilted world knew nothing of:

  • Tous les poèmes de Thomas Hardy débutant par la lettre A

B

  • "Between Us Now"

    Between us now and here -
    Two thrown together
    Who are not wont to wear
    Life's flushest feather -
    Who see the scenes slide past,

  • Beeny Cliff

    I
    O the opal and the sapphire of that wandering western sea,
    And the woman riding high above with bright hair flapping free-

  • Between Us Now

    Between us now and here--
    Two thrown together
    Who are not wont to wear
    Life's flushest feather--

  • Birds at Winter Nightfall (Triolet)

    Around the house the flakes fly faster,
    And all the berries now are gone
    From holly and cotoneaster

  • By the Earth's Corpse

    I
    "O Lord, why grievest Thou? -
    Since Life has ceased to be
    Upon this globe, now cold
    As lunar land and sea,

C

  • Cardinal Bembo's Epitaph on Raphael

    Here's one in whom Nature feared--faint at such vying -
    Eclipse while he lived, and decease at his dying.

  • Catullus: XXXI

    (After passing Sirmione, April 1887.)
    Sirmio, thou dearest dear of strands
    That Neptune strokes in lake and sea,

  • Channel Firing

    That night your great guns, unawares,
    Shook all our coffins as we lay,
    And broke the chancel window-squares,

D

  • De Profundis

    I
    "Percussus sum sicut foenum, et aruit cor meum."
    - Ps. ci
    Wintertime nighs;
    But my bereavement-pain
    It cannot bring again:

  • Departure (Southampton Docks: October, 1899)

    While the far farewell music thins and fails,
    And the broad bottoms rip the bearing brine -

  • Departure.

    While the far farewell music thins and fails,
    And the broad bottoms rip the bearing brine -

  • Ditty

    (E. L. G.)
    BENEATH a knap where flown
    Nestlings play,
    Within walls of weathered stone,
    Far away

  • Domicilium

    It faces west, and round the back and sides
    High beeches, bending, hang a veil of boughs,

  • Doom and She

    I
    There dwells a mighty pair -
    Slow, statuesque, intense -
    Amid the vague Immense:
    None can their chronicle declare,

  • Drummer Hodge

    They throw in Drummer Hodge, to rest
    Uncoffined -- just as found:
    His landmark is a kopje-crest
    That breaks the veldt around:

  • During Wind and Rain

    THEY sing their dearest songs--
    He, she, all of them--yea,
    Treble and tenor and bass.
    And one to play;

E

  • Embarcation

    Southampton Docks: October 1899
    Here, where Vespasian's legions struck the sands,
    And Cendric with the Saxons entered in,

  • Embarcation (Southampton Docks: October, 1899)

    Here, where Vespasian's legions struck the sands,
    And Cerdic with his Saxons entered in,
    And Henry's army leapt afloat to win

  • Epitaph on a pessimist

    I'm Smith of Stoke aged sixty odd
    I've lived without a dame all my life
    And wish to God
    My dad had done the same.

F

  • Fragment

    At last I entered a long dark gallery,
    Catacomb-lined; and ranged at the side
    Were the bodies of men from far and wide

  • Friends Beyond

    WILLIAM Dewy, Tranter Reuben, Farmer Ledlow late at plough,
    Robert's kin, and John's, and Ned's,

  • From Victor Hugo

    Child, were I king, I'd yield my royal rule,
    My chariot, sceptre, vassal-service due,

G

  • [Greek Title]

    Long have I framed weak phantasies of Thee,
    O Willer masked and dumb!
    Who makest Life become, -

  • Genoa and the Mediterranean (March, 1887)

    O epic-famed, god-haunted Central Sea,
    Heave careless of the deep wrong done to thee

  • Genoa and the Mediterranean.

    O epic-famed, god-haunted Central Sea,
    Heave careless of the deep wrong done to thee

  • George Meredith

    Forty years back, when much had place
    That since has perished out of mind,
    I heard that voice and saw that face.

  • God's Funeral

    I
    I saw a slowly-stepping train --
    Lined on the brows, scoop-eyed and bent and hoar --
    Following in files across a twilit plain

  • God-Forgotten

    I towered far, and lo! I stood within
    The presence of the Lord Most High,
    Sent thither by the sons of earth, to win

H

  • "How Great My Grief" (Triolet)

    How great my grief, my joys how few,
    Since first it was my fate to know thee!
    - Have the slow years not brought to view

  • Hap

    IF but some vengeful god would call to me
    From up the sky, and laugh: "Thou suffering thing,

  • He Never Expected Much

    Well, World, you have kept faith with me,
    Kept faith with me;
    Upon the whole you have proved to be
    Much as you said you were.

  • Heiress And Architect

    For A. W. B.
    SHE sought the Studios, beckoning to her side
    An arch-designer, for she planned to build.

  • Her Death And After

    'TWAS a death-bed summons, and forth I went
    By the way of the Western Wall, so drear
    On that winter night, and sought a gate--

  • Her Dilemma

    THE two were silent in a sunless church,
    Whose mildewed walls, uneven paving-stones,

  • Her Immortality

    UPON a noon I pilgrimed through
    A pasture, mile by mile,
    Unto the place where I last saw
    My dead Love's living smile.

  • Her Initals

    UPON a poet's page I wrote
    Of old two letters of her name;
    Part seemed she of the effulgent thought

  • Her Initials

    Upon a poet?s page I wrote
    Of old two letters of her name;
    Part seemed she of the effulgent thought

  • Her Late Husband (King's-Hintock, 182-.)

    "No--not where I shall make my own;
    But dig his grave just by
    The woman's with the initialed stone -
    As near as he can lie -

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I

  • "I Have Lived With Shades"

    I
    I have lived with shades so long,
    And talked to them so oft,
    Since forth from cot and croft
    I went mankind among,

  • "I Need Not Go"

    I need not go
    Through sleet and snow
    To where I know
    She waits for me;
    She will wait me there
    Till I find it fair,

  • "I Said to Love"

    I said to Love,
    "It is not now as in old days
    When men adored thee and thy ways
    All else above;

  • I have lived with Shades

    I
    I have lived with Shades so long,
    So long have talked to them,
    I sped to street and throng,
    That sometimes they

  • I Look Into My Glass

    I LOOK into my glass,
    And view my wasting skin,
    And say, "Would God it came to pass
    My heart had shrunk as thin!"

  • I said to Love

    I said to Love,
    "It is not now as in old days
    When men adored thee and thy ways
    All else above;

  • I Said to Love.

    I said to Love,
    "It is not now as in old days
    When men adored thee and thy ways
    All else above;

  • In A Eweleaze Near Weatherbury

    THE years have gathered grayly
    Since I danced upon this leaze
    With one who kindled gayly
    Love's fitful ecstasies!

  • In a Museum

    I
    Here's the mould of a musical bird long passed from light,
    Which over the earth before man came was winging;

  • In a Wood

    In a Wood
    Pale beech and pine-tree blue,
    Set in one clay,
    Bough to bough cannot you
    Bide out your day?

  • Tous les poèmes de Thomas Hardy débutant par la lettre I

L

  • Last Words to a Dumb Friend

    Pet was never mourned as you,
    Purrer of the spotless hue,
    Plumy tail, and wistful gaze
    While you humoured our queer ways,

  • Leipzig

    "OLD Norbert with the flat blue cap--
    A German said to be--
    Why let your pipe die on your lap,
    Your eyes blink absently?"--

  • Let Me Enjoy

    Minor Key
    I
    Let me enjoy the earth no less
    Because the all-enacting Might
    That fashioned forth its loveliness

  • Lines

    Spoken by Miss Ada Rehan at the Lyceum Theatre, July 23, 1890, at a

  • Lines On The Loss Of The "Titanic"

    In a solitude of the sea
    Deep from human vanity,
    And the Pride of Life that planned her, stilly couches she.

  • Long Plighted

    Is it worth while, dear, now,
    To call for bells, and sally forth arrayed
    For marriage-rites -- discussed, decried, delayed

M

  • Mad Judy

    When the hamlet hailed a birth
    Judy used to cry:
    When she heard our christening mirth
    She would kneel and sigh.

  • Men Who March Away

    Song of the Soldiers
    What of the faith and fire within us
    Men who march away
    Ere the barn-cocks say
    Night is growing gray,

  • Middle-Age Enthusiasms

    To M. H.
    WE passed where flag and flower
    Signalled a jocund throng;
    We said: "Go to, the hour
    Is apt!"--and joined the song;

  • Midnight on the Great Western

    In the third-class seat sat the journeying boy,
    And the roof-lamp's oily flame
    Played down on his listless form and face,

  • Mismet

    He was leaning by a face,
    He was looking into eyes,
    And he knew a trysting-place,
    And he heard seductive sighs;
    But the face,

  • Moments of Vision

    That mirror
    Which makes of men a transparency,
    Who holds that mirror
    And bids us such a breast-bare spectacle see

  • Mute Opinion

    I
    I traversed a dominion
    Whose spokesmen spake out strong
    Their purpose and opinion
    Through pulpit, press, and song.

  • My Cicely

    "ALIVE?"--And I leapt in my wonder,
    Was faint of my joyance,
    And grasses and grove shone in garments
    Of glory to me.

  • My spirit will not haunt the mound

    My spirit will not haunt the mound
    Above my breast,
    But travel, memory-possessed,
    To where my tremulous being found

N

  • Nature's Questioning

    WHEN I look forth at dawning, pool,
    Field, flock, and lonely tree,
    All seem to look at me

  • Neutral Tones

    WE stood by a pond that winter day,
    And the sun was white, as though chidden of God,
    And a few leaves lay on the starving sod,

  • Night in the Old Home

    When the wasting embers redden the chimney-breast,
    And Life's bare pathway looms like a desert track to me,

  • No Buyers

    A Load of brushes and baskets and cradles and chairs
    Labours along the street in the rain:

O

P

  • Postponement

    SNOW-BOUND in woodland, a mournful word,
    Dropt now and then from the bill of a bird,

R

S

  • San Sebastian

    With Thoughts of Sergeant M---- (Pensioner), who died 185-
    "WHY, Sergeant, stray on the Ivel Way,

  • Sapphic Fragment

    "Thou shalt be--Nothing."--Omar Khayyam.
    "Tombless, with no remembrance."--W. Shakespeare.
    Dead shalt thou lie; and nought

  • Satires of Circumstance in Fifteen Glimpses VIII: In the St

    He enters, and mute on the edge of a chair
    Sits a thin-faced lady, a stranger there,
    A type of decayed gentility;

  • She At His Funeral

    THEY bear him to his resting-place--
    In slow procession sweeping by;
    I follow at a stranger's space;

  • She Hears the Storm

    There was a time in former years--
    While my roof-tree was his--
    When I should have been distressed by fears

  • She, at His Funeral

    They bear him to his resting-place?
    In slow procession sweeping by;
    I follow at a stranger?s space;

  • She, To Him

    I
    WHEN you shall see me lined by tool of Time,
    My lauded beauties carried off from me,

  • She, To Him III

    I WILL be faithful to thee; aye, I will!
    And Death shall choose me with a wondering eye
    That he did not discern and domicile

  • She, To Him IV

    THIS love puts all humanity from me;
    I can but maledict her, pray her dead,
    For giving love and getting love of thee--

  • She, to Him, I

    When you shall see me lined by tool of Time,
    My lauded beauties carried off from me,
    My eyes no longer stars as in their prime,

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T

U

  • Under the Waterfall

    'Whenever I plunge my arm, like this,
    In a basin of water, I never miss
    The sweet sharp sense of a fugitive day

  • Unknowing

    WHEN, soul in soul reflected,
    We breathed an æthered air,
    When we neglected
    All things elsewhere,

V

  • V.R. 1819-1901 (A Reverie.)

    Moments the mightiest pass calendared,
    And when the Absolute
    In backward Time outgave the deedful word

  • V.R. 1819-1901, A Reverie

    Moments the mightiest pass uncalendared,
    And when the Absolute
    In backward Time outgave the deedful word

  • Valenciennes

    By Corporal Tullidge. See "The Trumpet-Major"
    In Memory of S. C. (Pensioner). Died 184-
    WE trenched, we trumpeted and drummed,

W

  • Weathers

    This is the weather the cuckoo likes,
    And so do I;
    When showers betumble the chestnut spikes,
    And nestlings fly;

  • When I Set Out for Lyonnesse

    When I set out for Lyonnesse,
    A hundred miles away,
    The rime was on the spray,
    And starlight lit my lonesomeness

  • Winter in Durnover Field

    Scene.--A wide stretch of fallow ground recently sown with wheat, and

  • Wives in the Sere

    I
    Never a careworn wife but shows,
    If a joy suffuse her,
    Something beautiful to those
    Patient to peruse her,

Z