Poésies de William Blake

gbPoésie britannique

A

  • A Cradle Song

    Sweet dreams form a shade,
    O'er my lovely infants head.
    Sweet dreams of pleasant streams,
    By happy silent moony beams

  • A Divine Image

    Cruelty has a human heart,
    And Jealousy a human face;
    Terror the human form divine,
    And Secresy the human dress.

  • A Dream

    Once a dream did weave a shade
    O'er my angel-guarded bed,
    That an emmet lost its way
    Where on grass methought I lay.

  • A Little Boy Lost

    v'Nought loves another as itself,
    Nor venerates another so,
    Nor is it possible to thought
    A greater than itself to know.

  • A Little Girl Lost

    Children of the future age,
    Reading this indignant page,
    Know that in a former time
    Love, sweet love, was thought a crime.

  • A Poison Tree

    I was angry with my friend:
    I told my wrath, my wrath did end.
    I was angry with my foe:
    I told it not, my wrath did grow.

  • A Song

    Sweet dreams, form a shade
    O'er my lovely infant's head!
    Sweet dreams of pleasant streams
    By happy, silent, moony beams!

  • A War Song to Englishmen

    Prepare, prepare the iron helm of war,
    Bring forth the lots, cast in the spacious orb;

  • Ah Sunflower

    Ah Sunflower, weary of time,
    Who countest the steps of the sun;
    Seeking after that sweet golden clime

  • Ah! Sun-Flower

    Ah, Sun-flower! weary of time,
    Who countest the steps of the Sun,
    Seeking after that sweet golden clime

  • Tous les poèmes de William Blake débutant par la lettre A

B

C

  • Clod and the Pebble, The

    "Love seeketh not itself to please,
    Nor for itself hath any care,
    But for another gives its ease,

  • Cradle Song

    Sleep, sleep, beauty bright,
    Dreaming in the joys of night;
    Sleep, sleep; in thy sleep
    Little sorrows sit and weep.

  • Crystal Cabinet, The

    The Maiden caught me in the wild,
    Where I was dancing merrily;
    She put me into her Cabinet,
    And lock'd me up with a golden key.

D

  • Day

    The Sun arises in the East,
    Cloth'd in robes of blood and gold;
    Swords and spears and wrath increast

  • Devine Image

    To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love,
    All pray in their distress,
    And to these virtues of delight
    Return their thankfulness.

  • Divine Image, The

    To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
    All pray in their distress;
    And to these virtues of delight
    Return their thankfulness.

E

  • Earth's Answer

    Earth raised up her head
    From the darkness dread and drear,
    Her light fled,
    Stony, dread,

  • Echoing Green, The

    The sun does arise,
    And make happy the skies;
    The merry bells ring
    To welcome the spring;
    The skylark and thrush,

  • England! awake! awake! awake!

    England! awake! awake! awake!
    Jerusalem thy Sister calls!
    Why wilt thou sleep the sleep of death

  • Eternity

    He who binds to himself a joy
    Does the winged life destroy;
    But he who kisses the joy as it flies
    Lives in eternity's sun rise.

F

  • Fair Elanor

    The bell struck one, and shook the silent tower;
    The graves give up their dead: fair Elenor

  • Fly, The

    Little Fly,
    Thy summer's play
    My thoughtless hand
    Has brushed away.
    Am not I
    A fly like thee?
    Or art not thou
    A man like me?

  • Four Zoas, The (excerpt)

    1.1"What is the price of Experience? do men buy it for a song?

  • French Revolution, The (excerpt)

    84Thee the ancientest peer, Duke of Burgundy, rose from the monarch's right hand, red as wines

  • From Milton: And did those feet

    And did those feet in ancient time
    Walk upon England's mountains green?
    And was the holy Lamb of God

G

  • Garden of Love, The

    I laid me down upon a bank,
    Where Love lay sleeping;
    I heard among the rushes dank
    Weeping, weeping.

  • Grey Monk, The

    "I die, I die!" the Mother said,
    "My children die for lack of bread.
    What more has the merciless Tyrant said?"

  • Gwin King of Norway

    Come, kings, and listen to my song:
    When Gwin, the son of Nore,
    Over the nations of the North
    His cruel sceptre bore;

H

  • Hear the Voice

    HEAR the voice of the Bard,
    Who present, past, and future, sees;
    Whose ears have heard
    The Holy Word

  • Hear the Voice of the Bard

    Hear the voice of the Bard !
    Who present, past, and future sees;
    Whose ears have heard
    The Holy Word,

  • Holy Thursday

    'Twas on a Holy Thursday, their innocent faces clean,
    Came children walking two and two, in read, and blue, and green:

  • Holy Thursday (Experience)

    Is this a holy thing to see.
    In a rich and fruitful land.
    Babes reduced to misery.
    Fed with cold and usurous hand?

  • Holy Thursday (Innocence)

    Twas on a Holy Thursday their innocent faces clean
    The children walking two & two in red & blue & green

  • How Sweet I Roam'd

    How sweet I roam'd from field to field,
    And tasted all the summer's pride
    'Til the prince of love beheld

I

  • I Heard an Angel

    I heard an Angel singing
    When the day was springing,
    'Mercy, Pity, Peace
    Is the world's release.'
    Thus he sung all day

  • I Rose Up at the Dawn of Day

    I rose up at the dawn of day--
    `Get thee away! get thee away!
    Pray'st thou for riches? Away! away!

  • I Saw a Chapel

    I saw a chapel all of gold
    That none did dare to enter in,
    And many weeping stood without,
    Weeping, mourning, worshipping.

  • I see the Four-fold Man

    I see the Four-fold Man, The Humanity in deadly sleep
    And its fallen Emanation, the Spectre and its cruel Shadow.

  • If It Is True What the Prophets Write

    If it is true, what the Prophets write,
    That the heathen gods are all stocks and stones,

  • Infant Joy

    'I have no name;
    I am but two days old.'
    What shall I call thee?
    'I happy am,
    Joy is my name.'
    Sweet joy befall thee!

  • Infant Sorrow

    My mother groaned, my father wept,
    Into the dangerous world I leapt;
    Helpless, naked, piping loud,
    Like a fiend hid in a cloud.

  • Introduction to Songs of Experience

    Hear the voice of the Bard,
    Who present, past, and future, sees;
    Whose ears have heard
    The Holy Word

  • Introduction to the Songs of Innocence

    Piping down the valleys wild,
    Piping songs of pleasant glee,
    On a cloud I saw a child,
    And he laughing said to me:

J

L

  • Lamb, The

    Little Lamb, who made thee?
    Dost thou know who made thee?
    Gave thee life, and bid thee feed,
    By the stream and o'er the mead;

  • Land of Dreams, The

    Awake, awake, my little boy!
    Thou wast thy mother's only joy;
    Why dost thou weep in thy gentle sleep?

  • Laughing Song

    When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy,
    And the dimpling stream runs laughing by;

  • Lily, The

    The modest Rose puts forth a thorn,
    The humble sheep a threat'ning horn:
    While the Lily white shall in love delight,

  • Little Black Boy, The

    My mother bore me in the southern wild,
    And Iam black, but oh my soul is white!
    White as an angel is the English child,

  • Little Boy Found, The

    The little boy lost in the lonely fen,
    Led by the wandering light,
    Began to cry, but God, ever nigh,

  • Little Boy Lost, The

    "Father, father, where are you going?
    Oh do not walk so fast!
    Speak, father, speak to you little boy,
    Or else I shall be lost."

  • Little Vagabond, The

    Dear mother, dear mother, the church is cold,
    But the ale-house is healthy and pleasant and warm;

  • London

    I wandered through each chartered street,
    Near where the chartered Thames does flow,
    A mark in every face I meet,

  • Love and Harmony

    Love and harmony combine,
    And round our souls entwine
    While thy branches mix with mine,
    And our roots together join.

  • Tous les poèmes de William Blake débutant par la lettre L

M

N

  • Never Seek to Tell thy Love

    Never seek to tell thy love
    Love that never told can be;
    For the gentle wind does move
    Silently, invisibly.

  • New Jerusalem, The

    And did those feet in ancient time
    Walk upon England's mountains green?
    And was the holy Lamb of God

  • Night

    The sun descending in the west,
    The evening star does shine;
    The birds are silent in their nest,
    And I must seek for mine.

  • Now Art Has Lost Its Mental Charms

    `Now Art has lost its mental charms
    France shall subdue the world in arms.'
    So spoke an Angel at my birth;

  • Nurse's Song (Innocence)

    When voices of children are heard on the green
    And laughing is heard on the hill,
    My heart is at rest within my breast

O

  • On Another's Sorrow

    Can I see another's woe,
    And not be in sorrow too?
    Can I see another's grief,
    And not seek for kind relief?

P

Q

  • Question Answered, The

    What is it men in women do require?
    The lineaments of gratified Desire.
    What is it women do in men require?

R

  • Reeds of Innocence

    Piping down the valleys wild,
    Piping songs of pleasant glee,
    On a cloud I saw a child,
    And he laughing said to me:

S

  • Samson

    Samson, the strongest of the children of men, I sing; how he was foiled by woman's arts, by a false wife brought to the gates o

  • Schoolboy, The

    I love to rise in a summer morn
    When the birds sing on every tree;
    The distant huntsman winds his horn,

  • Several Questions Answered

    What is it men in women do require?
    The lineaments of Gratified Desire.
    What is it women do in men require?

  • Sick Rose, The

    O Rose, thou art sick!
    The invisible worm
    That flies in the night,
    In the howling storm,
    Has found out thy bed
    Of crimson joy:

  • Silent, Silent Night

    Silent, silent night,
    Quench the holy light
    Of thy torches bright;
    For possessed of Day
    Thousand spirits stray

  • Sleep! Sleep! Beauty Bright

    Sleep! sleep! beauty bright,
    Dreaming o'er the joys of night;
    Sleep! sleep! in thy sleep
    Little sorrows sit and weep.

  • Song

    My silks and fine array,
    My smiles and languish'd air,
    By love are driv'n away;
    And mournful lean Despair

  • Song: Memory, hither come

    Memory, hither come,
    And tune your merry notes;
    And, while upon the wind
    Your music floats,
    I'll pore upon the stream

  • Songs Of Experience: Introduction

    Hear the voice of the Bard!
    Who Present, Past, & Future sees
    Whose ears have heard
    The Holy Word,

  • Songs Of Innocence: Introduction

    Piping down the valleys wild
    Piping songs of pleasant glee
    On a cloud I saw a child.
    And he laughing said to me.

  • Tous les poèmes de William Blake débutant par la lettre S

T

W

  • When Klopstock England Defied

    When Klopstock England defied,
    Uprose William Blake in his pride;
    For old Nobodaddy aloft
    . . . and belch'd and cough'd;

  • Why Should I Care for the Men of Thames

    Why should I care for the men of thames
    Or the cheating waves of charter'd streams
    Or shrink at the little blasts of fear

  • Why Was Cupid a Boy

    Why was Cupid a boy,
    And why a boy was he?
    He should have been a girl,
    For aught that I can see.
    For he shoots with his bow,

  • Wild Flower's Song, The

    As I wandered the forest,
    The green leaves among,
    I heard a Wild Flower
    Singing a song.
    "I slept in the earth

Y

  • You Don't Believe

    You don't believe -- I won't attempt to make ye:
    You are asleep -- I won't attempt to wake ye.